© Walter Jardine 2018
Names and Terms
Name/Term
Pronunciation
Meaning
Acharacle
A-har’-a-kl
From the Gaelic meaning Torquil’s ford
Argyll
Ar-gile’
From the old Gaelic Airer Gàidel (modern Gaelic Earra-Ghàidheal) meaning ‘coastland of the Gaels’.
Cairbre Riata
Kah’-bruh Ree-ah’-tuh
A leader of the family after whom Dal Riata (meaning ‘Riata’s share’) is said to be named.
ceilidh
kay’lee
Gaelic/Celtic social gathering or celebration with music and dancing. In ancient times also could be a literary festival or recitation of clan history etc.
Clan Cholla
Clan Cah’-luh
Said to be the clan from which Somerled’s clan descended centuries earlier.
curragh
Kuh’-rukh (the’kh’ is a soft k as in the Scottish loch or Irish lough)
Also called a coracle, a curragh is a lightweight boat of hide over a wicker frame, still in use today but constructed from modern materials. Used on rivers, lakes and, the bigger ones, in coastal waters.
Dal Riata
Dal Ree-ah’-tuh
That area of south west Scotland that was colonised by Gaels beginning around the 3rd century AD, roughly equivalent to modern Argyll (from the Gaelic meaning “coast of the Gaels”).
Gilleadamnan
gil-a-ad-ov’-nan
Anglicised form of GiollaÁdhamhnán, meaning servant of Saint Adamnan.
Gillebhride
Gil’-a-vrij
Anglicised form of GiollaBrighde, meaning servant of Saint Brigid.
Gillecallum
Gil’-a-callum
Anglicised form of GiollaCaluim meaning servant of Saint Columba
Keava
Kee’-vuh
Anglicised form of Caoimhe, meaning beauty or grace
loch
“ch” is pronounced at the back of the throat as a soft “k”
A lake or sea inlet.
lough
It’s arguable as to whether to pronounce it as the Scottish “loch” or as the English “lock”.
A lake or sea inlet. “Lough” is an anglicised version of “loch”, hence you will hear the loch and lock versions being used in Ireland.
Mormaer
Mor’-mer
A regional or provincial ruler (Gaelic: Rí), second in rank to the king (Gaelic: Ard Rí). There would be several clans, and therefore clan chiefs, under his rule. The rank is equivalent to an English earl or continental Count. In Scotland, they were responsible for electing the tanist who would replace the current king when he died. This system (tanistry) was replaced by the Norman system of primogeniture.
plaid
plad
A blanket about 5ft x 18ft (1.5m x 5.5m) plain colour or patterned, worn as a wrap- around coat in cold weather.
Ragnhilde
Rahn-hild
Norse name, meaning counsel, advice; or battle, fight
seannachie
shaw’-na-kee
A “story-teller” or bard, historian, and genealogist who carried the tribe’s history from one generation to the next.
Sorley
Sor’-lee or Sor’ luh
Anglicised form of the Gaelic name Somhairle which itself is the Gaelic form of a Norse name which is rendered in English as Somerled.
© Walter Jardine 2018
Names and Terms
Name/Term
Pronunciation
Meaning
Acharacle
A-har’-a-kl
From the Gaelic meaning Torquil’s ford
Argyll
Ar-gile’
From the old Gaelic Airer Gàidel (modern Gaelic Earra- Ghàidheal) meaning ‘coastland of the Gaels’.
Cairbre Riata
Kah’-bruh Ree-ah’- tuh
A leader of the family after whom Dal Riata (meaning ‘Riata’s share’) is said to be named.
ceilidh
kay’lee
Gaelic/Celtic social gathering or celebration with music and dancing. In ancient times also could be a literary festival or recitation of clan history etc.
Clan Cholla
Clan Cah’-luh
Said to be the clan from which Somerled’s clan descended centuries earlier.
curragh
Kuh’-rukh (the’kh’ is a soft k as in the Scottish loch or Irish lough)
Also called a coracle, a curragh is a lightweight boat of hide over a wicker frame, still in use today but constructed from modern materials. Used on rivers, lakes and, the bigger ones, in coastal waters.
Dal Riata
Dal Ree-ah’-tuh
That area of south west Scotland that was colonised by Gaels beginning around the 3rd century AD, roughly equivalent to modern Argyll (from the Gaelic meaning “coast of the Gaels”).
Gilleadamnan
gil-a-ad-ov’-nan
Anglicised form of GiollaÁdhamhnán, meaning servant of Saint Brigid
Gillebhride
Gil’-a-vrij
Anglicised form of GiollaBrighde, meaning servant of Saint Brigid.
Gillecallum
Gil’-a-callum
Anglicised form of GiollaCaluim meaning servant of Saint Columba
Keava
Kee’-vuh
Anglicised form of Caoimhe, meaning beauty or grace
loch
“ch” is pronounced at the back of the throat as a soft “k”
A lake or sea inlet.
lough
It’s arguable as to whether to pronounce it as the Scottish “loch” or as the English “lock”.
A lake or sea inlet. “Lough” is an anglicised version of “loch”, hence you will hear the loch and lock versions being used in Ireland.
Mormaer
Mor’-mer
A regional or provincial ruler (Gaelic: Rí), second in rank to the king (Gaelic: Ard Rí). There would be several clans, and therefore clan chiefs, under his rule. The rank is equivalent to an English earl or continental Count. In Scotland, they were responsible for electing the tanist who would replace the current king when he died. This system (tanistry) was replaced by the Norman system of primogeniture.
plaid
plad
A blanket about 5ft x 18ft (1.5m x 5.5m) plain colour or patterned, worn as a wrap- around coat in cold weather.
Ragnhilde
Rahn-hild
Norse name, meaning counsel, advice; or battle, fight
seannachie
shaw’-na-kee
A “story-teller” or bard, historian, and genealogist who carried the tribe’s history from one generation to the next.
Sorley
Sor’-lee or Sor’ luh
Anglicised form of the Gaelic name Somhairle which itself is the Gaelic form of a Norse name which is rendered in English as Somerled.

Walter Jardine

Somerled

Pronunciation

About Somerled and Medieval Scotland

Walter Jardine

Somerled

Pronunciation